Paul Kedrosky

Paul Kedrosky

Paul Kedrosky has a better life than you do. He’s relaxed, and funny, and fit, and good-looking. He lives in San Diego, bikes a lot and always looks tanned and healthy in a new black T-shirt and jeans. He seems to make money effortlessly, just by being clever and geeky, not that it’s entirely obvious what he does — except for blogging, of course, in which he recently turned pro by moving the financial half

The Wealth Report

The Wealth Report

On his Wall Street Journal blog the Wealth Report, Robert Frank writes with neither fear nor favor about a relatively tiny but endlessly fascinating tribe: the very, very rich. He covers everything from tax policy to — well, here, read it for yourself: “The bride’s family gave the groom a Bell 429 helicopter.” (That’s from a reported $20 million wedding in India.) Another sentence worth rereading: “One thing I have noticed about rich people is

Business Insider

Business Insider

The thinking man’s finance blog it is not. But if you are looking for all manner of business and economic news, as well as Wall Street gossip and what’s hot on the Web, Business Insider is the best place to go. Unfortunately, more and more of the content on the blog is basically plucked from elsewhere without a lot of original analysis or reporting. But Business Insider, which is headed by former Wall Street analyst

Grasping Reality with a Sharp Beak

Grasping Reality with a Sharp Beak

It’s hard to imagine J. Bradford DeLong writing Grasping Reality. The blog’s form and topics vary widely. At times, the UC Berkeley economics professor is imagining a philosophical dialogue between two narrators. At others, he is deeply investigating complex financial or economic research topics, sharing rough drafts of his course’s syllabi, dissecting economic indicators or tearing apart the latest weak and/or dishonest argument that has wandered into the blogosphere. And yet it all comes from

Econbrowser

Econbrowser

I read Econbrowser every day. But even those who don’t might still recognize the name of one of the co-authors if they ever took an advanced economics course. Econbrowser co-author and UC San Diego professor James Hamilton literally wrote the textbook on using math in economic research. The authors, who also include Menzie Chinn, an economics professor at the University of Wisconsin, cover many macroeconomic issues in an understandable and straightforward manner. Chinn focuses on